Tags Archives: Rapper

MCMI REPORT: 1st Annual VitalGroundz Senior Class

Presenting the 1st Annual VitalGroundz Senior Class, the Class of 2017.

We are now over 40 years emerged into the culture of Hip Hop. The fact that Jay Z just dropped his 13th album, at age 47, and it went platinum in less than a week proves that Hip Hop spans generations and is more than just a young man’s sport. In an era where there are several heavy hitting artists who have 20+ years under their belts and are still dropping new music (Jay-Z, Nas, Eminem, Common, The Roots, Busta Rhymes, Dr. Dre, Snoop, The Lox – the list goes on), and other slightly younger artists that have been maintaining relevance (i.e. Joe Budden, Talib Kweli, Immortal Technique), new artists are also breaking onto the scene at later ages than they used to. Not that there isn’t room for younger artists like Joey BadA$$ or Chance the Rapper, but it seems Hip Hop and its audience has matured and diversified to the extent that there are no longer any “rules” regarding style, genre, gender and yes, even age.

1st Annual VitalGroundz Senior Class

That being said, the MCees featured in the first VitalGroundz Senior Class are not ancient, it’s just that VitalGroundz doesn’t feel the requirements for being a “hot new artist” includes being a teenager, nor should it be based on social media stats, or other superficial measurements that don’t really have anything to do with whether or not a song or an artist is “good Hip Hop music“. Instead, VitalGroundz looks at lyrics, content, wordplay, skill, pure readiness and unique style. One perfect example of this is MCMI’s own LR Blitzkrieg, who is one of this year’s 10 featured MCees, who has put in several guest appearances over the years and is known on the NY underground Hip Hop scene, but is just about to drop his debut solo project, “OuttaNowhere“, in the next few months.

Rather than celebrate the next batch of “Freshman“, VitalGroundz has created a lane for artists who have been honing their skills for some years on the underground, or paying dues in other ways, while developing craft, that are now ready to burst upon the scene.

You can check out the other 9 featured artists from this years Senior Class on VitalGroundz’ Youtube Channel, which you can subscribe to here.

So what do you think? Do you like VitalGroundz’ new platform for emerging artists? Are the MCees in the Class of 2017 dope? Which one killed it the most? Is this the antidote to BET ciphers filled with the latest crop of mumble rappers? Do you or someone you know have what it takes to be featured next year?

For more infowww.vitalgroundz.com | info@vitalgroundz.com

1st Annual VitalGroundz Senior Class

– GMS (@GMS_MCMI on everything – Friend on FBIGTW, SC)

LR Blitzkrieg (@LR_Blitzkrieg on everything– Friend on IGTWSC)

CHORDZ CORDERO

CHORDZ CORDERO in studio

CHORDZ CORDERO

Chordz Cordero is a Jamaica Queens artist that has been perfecting his skills as an emcee, singer, producer, and musician since a child. He has collaborated with artists such as St. Joe Louis, Brokn.Englsh, Daniel Joseph, Swave Sevah, PH and GMS, to name a few. A few years ago, a chance encounter with PH led to some musical collaborations with MCMI.

 “I met PH at a Jean Grae concert at Highline Ballroom a few years back, when he was performing with his former group Brooklyn Academy. After a few chats we got together to do some tracks for both of our projects.“ – Chordz

PH introduced Chordz to GMS and Blitzkrieg, co-founders of MCMI Records.  Hearing great talent and potential, they decided to work with Chordz to release some music. Chordz’ first work on the indie label was a collaboration with GMS, who laid the musical foundations for the song FREEDOM: How We Get.

FREEDOM-cover-art-570

The song is an ode to personal spiritual freedom, with production by GMS and vocals by Cordero. Besides making the beat, GMS plays flute on the track, while Chordz takes ’em to church with his original heartfelt lyrics about struggle, perseverance and redemption. Released digitally on January 15th, 2012, just in time for freedom fighter Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday, the song was very well received all over the world, getting airplay as far away as South Africa, where some producers put out an unofficial, unauthorized dance remix of the record. An official dance remake of the song is in the works and will appear on an upcoming project.

TylerPerryMovieCatalyst570

After Freedom, Chordz dropped a project with label mate PH (“This Is Not a Tyler Perry Movie“) and an EP with DC producer JUDAH (“Catalyst: [E]volution (EP)“), on DubMD Promotions. The two projects received a flood of positive feedback from the blogosphere and have expanded Chordz audience, doing well throughout Spain, Germany, Australia, Japan, the UK and the United States.

In 2015, Chordz dropped “The HIGHBRED LP“, a collaboration with fellow MC Sir Manley and producer Boonie Mayfield, on MCMI Records. He is available for collabs and choruses and will be putting out more music soon.

 

@MCMIreport | @ChordzCordero

COMMON AT THE WHITE HOUSE

Common head shot

I wish I could say I’m surprised, but I’m not. That a rapper is going to the White House? No, that’s been done. That since it is a black President – and a democrat – the right wing media is up in arms? Yeah, that’s what I’m referring to.

I wouldn’t go as far as Kyle Anderson of Music Mix, saying

Common is about the least controversial rapper in the business. He’s roughly as edgy as LeVar Burton. He’s the rap version of Wayne Brady. He’s a friendly, easy-going, cross-cultural musician and actor who stars in easygoing rom-coms with Queen Latifah, only appears menacing to Tina Fey and Steve Carrell on celluloid

– um, that’s a little overdoing it, lol. I mean, Common is a positive dude, but he’s not soft. He did a dis record calling Gangsta Rapper Ice Cube a “Bitch”, remember? And he has some very controversial lyrics, mostly political. But that’s not inappropriate, for a poet or for an MC.  That’s what they do – have and express controversial ideas and opinions. But what Kyle said describing Common as a “conscious MC” is more to the point:

Common is a smart guy who uses his music to talk about complicated ideas and the vagaries of modern life. Few rappers talk about personal relationships and social injustice as astutely as Common, and his deeply-considered work is the sort of stuff that should be inspiring young people (especially those interested in poetry).

And that’s what makes him relevant to a discussion of poetry. Plenty of Common’s Hip Hop song lyrics flow like poetry and then he actually has poems as well, on HBO’s Russel Simmons presents Def Poetry, for instance. Whichever you are listening to, it is instantly clear that Common is a great communicator of ideas and expresser of passionate emotion, which perfectly describes the role of any artist. So, the fact that Michelle Obama wanted him to teach a poetry workshop to the youth (something else he has done before in his hometown Chicago) and perform some of his songs at the White House event, makes perfect sense.

Still, Hannity, Sara Palin, Karl Rove and others have all spoken out against the First Lady for inviting this “vile” rapper Common to the event. It’s really kind of laughable. I mean, read or listen to Hannity’s commentary, as published on FoxNews Website.

So, what is it they are claiming Common talks about in his raps?

1) murdering George W. Bush by settin him on fire,

2) carrying guns

3) killing cops

[* Watch some of Common’s videos, plus video footage of the White House performance and hear me call Sean Hannity and Sara Palin “a dumb ass” – after the jump!] (more…)